This Model’s Intersexuality Gives Us Insight Into Gender Stereotyping

Kudos, Dove!

Psychologists claim that the way we dress (especially shoe-wise) is a major giveaway for the kind of personality traits we possess. The University of Kansas walked an extra mile and even conducted a successful study proving this stance.

Rain Dove, an androgynous model, gives us insight into the matter by sharing her “been-down-the-road” experiences and expertise with us. 27 years old and 6’ 2”, Rain has no problem when it comes to dressing like a he or a she. How that has affected her will blow you guys away.

When attending her first interview, Rain dressed like a girl, was selected, and was called the next day again. But the second day, she chose to be a guy and thus dressed like one. To her hope and surprise, no one noticed.

“Turns out the next day it was the men’s casting call and they assumed I was male. I decided to do it and it blew up my career pretty quickly,” Rain told us.

Facebook | Rain Dove

Only after her childhood was over did Rain discover the gender binary, though she did admit to having called herself “an ugly woman” all her life.

Facebook | Rain Dove

Among the few pros that came with her look was how she was able to dodge gender-specific job positions. “When I was a firefighter they thought I was a male and I went with it because I really needed a job and I was out in the middle of nowhere in Colorado,” she remembered.

“So I used my gender bending profile as something that had gotten me a bunch of odd jobs from nannying to landscape.”

Facebook | Rain Dove

She has walked the fashion runways for both sexes. Such flair!

Facebook | Rain Dove

“The smallest things can make the biggest difference,” she says. “A touch of lipstick with mascara and a different shoe type mixed with a coy attitude will get me to the treatment of what it is to be a ‘woman.'”

Facebook | Rain Dove

“Same clothes. Same place. Same person. But simply wearing different shoes can change how people treat me throughout the day,” she said.

Instagram | @raindovemodel

Apparently for Rain, baggy pants can make a big difference.

“Same shoes. Same hair. Same person. Same park. But the walk took twice as long in a dress because of the catcalling and people asking me questions,” she says. “Sometimes you just want to get from point A to B efficiently. For that I choose baggy jeans and a jacket.”

Facebook | Rain Dove

“When eaten in a dress people say ‘Rough day girl?’ Or ‘Watch it you’re gonna get fat,'” she says. “In a muscle shirt and pants they say ‘I remember when I had a high metabolism.’ Or ‘Young man’s got an appetite.’ It doesn’t get any better with fitness wear, either, where women typically have to show more skin.”

Facebook | Rain Dove

Her obsession with gymnasts and fondness for dress-up, ended in her tutoring herself.

She shared with us some of her gym-class anecdotes, women “bare their legs…in their one-piece arm covered attire. They wear full make up and often glitter everywhere. Men usually have long pants or leg covering and bare shoulders. And part is because a onesie would hug curves that the world has apparently agreed would be best left unhugged.”

Facebook | Rain Dove

“Women often run with a full face of makeup and wear short shorts and a sports bra.”

“Men wear long tight spandex to the knee and semi tight muscle shirts,” she says. “When doing this challenge I actually found that the women’s attire is easier to move in. Faster. But if you are body conscious or have large breasts then you may want to swap uniforms.”

Facebook | Rain Dove

About volleyball, she said, “Many people say this is a sexist sport and the statements from athletes are split.”

“Some say that wearing so little is actually easier to play the sport in and better for the sand,” she notes. “Some say that they need to look good for endorsements and sponsorship opportunities. So covering up isn’t an option. Pressure? Or practical?”

Facebook | Rain Dove

Women have more fashion choices and, “their fashion choices are commented on more (statistically 60-65 times more) often than ‘men.'”

“The flip side is that ‘men’ don’t get a lot of choices at all — so while there’s no worry, there’s also no freedom.”

Facebook | Rain Dove

But the disparaging mindset is here to stay.

“If I say I was a firefighter while wearing a dress people tend to say ‘Wow! That’s incredible! Was it hard? What an accomplishment!'” she says. “When in shirt and baggy pants they say, ‘That’s cool man. Is that what you still do or are you doing something else?'”

Facebook | Rain Dove

Rain’s experiences have given her insight into both sides.

“Women shouldn’t have to step into men’s roles to be empowered,” she says. “They should be able to step into themselves.”

Instagram | @raindovemodel

She even won a style award for a photo of her in a men’s jacket.

“It’s much better that way,” she says. “Because men who look at that photo and think ‘I would look great in that’ will see that the gender has nothing to do with it, just the clothing.”

Facebook | Rain Dove

“You know, I think you just have to realize it’s about your personal needs from society,” she says.

“Just because someone else said you’re one thing, doesn’t make that your definition. So your personal definition is the only definition that matters in your life.”

Instagram | @raindovemodel

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