These Are The 20 Women Who Changed The Science World

Celebrate their awesome achievements during this year’s Women’s History Month!

Quite simply, women are amazing.

Throughout history, women have fought to achieve their due rights again and again, which is why they have a month celebrating their progress every March.

In that vein, we’ll be celebrating Women’s History Month with the 20 woman who changed the world of science.

1. Miriam Daniel Mann

Mann graduated college with a degree in Chemistry and minor in Mathematics. She then gained a position at NASA’s predecessor; the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in the 1940s. She continuously campaigned against segregation at NASA, and her work contributed to John Glenn’s orbit of the moon.

2. Cynthia Kenyon

Cynthia is not only a geneticist but also a molecular biologist. Currently, she’s part of a team that’s researching how to slow aging and prevent age-related diseases.

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3.Rachel Carson

The writer and marine biologist wrote a book called, “Silent Spring” in 1962, warning against the adverse effects of pesticides. This research also led to the ban on lethal pesticides in the US.

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4.Sara Seager

The astronomer and planetary scientist discovered 715 exoplanets using the Kepler Space Telescope!

5. Jennifer Eberhardt

Eberhardt is a social psychologist who studies racially motivated police profiling. She works in collaboration with police forces to make profiling fairer.

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6. Dian Fossey

Fossey researched and lived among Rwanda’s Virunga Volcano Region gorillas. Her studies provided insight into gorilla behavior and social structure.

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7. Nina Tandon.

Nina is the co-founder and CEO of EpiBone. The company makes use of human stem cells to grow human bones. This new bone can be used to repair bone loss!

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8. Katrin Amunts

Katrin Amunts is a German neuroscientist who is heading a research team that is drawing a 3D map of the brain to figure out how it works in controlling human behavior.

9. Gertrude B. Elion

In her job as a pharmacologist and chemist, Elion discovered 6-mercaplopurine, a medicine used in children’s leukemia chemotherapy.

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10. Mae Carol Jemison

Jemison had the distinction of being the first black woman ever to travel into space. She was part of Space Shuttle Endeavor’s voyage on September 12, 1992.

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11. Cecilia Helena Payne-Gaposchkin

The first woman to get a Radcliffe Ph.D also proved in 1925 that hydrogen and helium were a star’s most potent elements.

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12. Jane Goodall

Goodall is considered a pioneer of the modern study of primatology. This was a result of decades of research on Tanzania’s Gombe chimpanzees.

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13. Grace Murray Hopper

In 1944, the mathematician not only contributed to the programming of the world’s first computers but also invented the first compiler for a computer programming language.

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14. Ada Lovelace

The computer scientist is quite possibly the first computer programmer ever. The computer programming language “Ada” is named for her.

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15. Judith Resnik

Resnik was among the first women to achieve a position in the U.S. space program. In 1984, she also became the second American woman to fly in space. Sadly, she was part of the doomed Space Shuttle Challenger crew and died in the shuttle’s explosion during descent.

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16. Margaret Mead

Margaret became the first anthropologist ever to research human development through a cross-cultural perspective. She studied and analyzed the cultures in Bali, America, New Guinea, and Samoa.

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17. Eleanor Maccoby

Maccoby is considered a pioneer in developmental psychology. Her work has influenced the study on the socializing of infants.

18. Rosalyn Sussman Yalow

Rosalyn was part of the discovery of the  RadioImmunoAssay (RIA) technique, which makes use of radioisotopes to measure the levels of hormones in the blood system.

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19. Emmy Noether

Noether was a master mathematician who developed theories of rings, fields, and algebras. Albert Einstein called her the most crucial woman in the history of mathematics.

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20. Inge Lehmann

The geophysicist and seismologist was the one who discovered that the Earth’s solid inner core was actually inside a molten outer core. Previously, the Earth’s core was believed to be a single core.

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