Pictures That Show How Fast Our Planet's Glaciers Are Disappearing

Sad and shocking!

Some people dismiss global warming because it’s an inconvenient truth to face. They disregard what scientists say, but these pictures of glaciers melting will surely prove once and for all that global warming is a real phenomenon that we need to stop.

Qori Kalis Glacier, Peru — 1978.

Belonging to the endangered breed of tropical glaciers, the Qori Kalis provides pure drinking water for the people.

 Ohio State University Lonnie Thompson
Ohio State University Lonnie Thompson

In 2002.

Nearly 24 years later and the loss in mass of this glacier can be seen easily. It has been measured that the glacier has lost half its length and shrinks at about 600 feet per year.

 Ohio State University Lonnie Thompson
Ohio State University Lonnie Thompson

Stein Glacier, Switzerland — 2006.

The majestic Stein Glacier is located in the Western Alps.

 Phys.org James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey
Phys.org James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey

In 2015.

The photos may have been nearly a decade apart, but the contrast is shockingly evident. Experts speculate that the glacier has lost about 1800 feet.

 Phys.org James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey
Phys.org James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey

Mendenhall Glacier, Alaska — 1894.

Mendenhall Glacier resides in the protected Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area in Alaska

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National Geographic NOAA

In 2008.

Although the glacier was already losing mass since the 1700s, the rise of global warming has made it alarmingly clear.

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National Geographic Gary Braasch

Carroll Glacier, Alaska — 1906.

This behemoth stretches for 15 miles from Canada’s border with Alaska to Queen’s Inlet on the Pacific.

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Brevard Biodiesel USGS

In 2004.

Nearly a century later, it is all but evident that the Carroll Glacier is in serious trouble with a significantly less voluminous ice cap.

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Brevard Biodiesel Bruce Molnia

Grinnell Glacier, Montana — 1920.

This once highlight of Montana’s National Park used to cover 710 acres in its prime.

 USGS NPS Archives
USGS NPS Archives

In 2008.

This shell of a glacier has lost approximately 40 percent of its mass. Experts predict all glaciers in the park will melt away by 2030.

 USGS Darren Pfeifle
USGS Darren Pfeifle

Kyetrak Glacier, Tibet — 1921.

First discovered by British explorers in 1921, Kyetrak Glacier lies in the Himalaya mountain range

 The Pelican Web Royal Geographical Society
The Pelican Web Royal Geographical Society

In 2009.

As a famously frequented route to the top of Cho Oyu, the sixth tallest mountain, this glacier experiences a lot of traffic, which, in conjunction with global warming, is the reason the Kyetrak has lost so much of its majesty.

 The Pelican Web Glacier Works
The Pelican Web Glacier Works

Toboggan Glacier, Alaska — 1909.

Named for its intimidating slopes, this mammoth of a glacier stretched all the way to the waterline once upon a time.

 Daily Mail USGS
Daily Mail USGS

In 2000.

This picture, taken almost a century later, shows that the Toboggan Glacier has been replaced by a much smaller glacier.

 Alaska Bruce Molnia
Alaska Bruce Molnia

Muir Glacier and Muir Inlet, Alaska — 1880.

This glacier has been subject to many conservation efforts ever since it was discovered by Scottish naturalist John Muir in the 19th century.

ZME Science
ZME Science

In 2005.

This glacier has retreated 7 miles since 1941.

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ZME Science

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