10 Movies That Had Completely Inaccurate Historical Facts

The movies you love have fooled you. Get the real lesson here!

Let’s start with a quick lesson: Do not use historical movies to learn about history. They’re meant to be primarily for entertainment. We have all done it, and that’s the biggest issue.

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Heck, I do this all the time. I go back and watch movies thinking that I can use them for informational purposes just because before the movie started it said those five little words: “Based on a true story”.

Unfortunately that’s not the case so, here are 10 movies that got certain historical facts allllll wrong.

1. Okay let’s begin with a big one. In the 2001 movie Pearl Harbor, a RIDICULOUS amount of Japanese fighters were taken down by two fighter pilots who had managed to reach the hanger.

Actually, out of the two actual pilots who were involved in the take down of six Japanese fighters, one of them had to say the movie was “a piece of trash… over-sensationalized and distorted.”

via Kinoweb

Then there’s this line that Josh Harnett says in the movie. Even though Pearl Harbor was in fact the reason the United States was dragged into the war, the world had already been at war well before, and America knew that.

The events of Pearl Harbor took place on the 7th of December 1941 whereas WWII started in 1939.

 

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via Giphy

2. In the movie 300, it portrays 300 Spartan soldiers defending their land from the Persian Army in the Battle of Thermoplylae. In reality, what happened was that the Spartans were joined by other Greek city-states to make up a total of 7,000 soldiers.

Sorry ladies, they actually wore shirts too.

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via Wiffle GIF

There’s another scene where it shows how Spartan children would ‘become’ men by killing a wolf. As cool of an idea as that is, they were, in reality, required to kill slaves.

They also made it seem like the Persians were slave traders even though the Spartans were actually THE slave masters.

via Flickr / George Yang

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